We talked with Kate from the Tri County Humane Society today about this week's featured adoptable pet.

Opal was today's guest.  She is an Australian Cattle Dog mix.  She is just over 3 years old and VERY active.  She loves to run and play and would do well with families that live an active lifestyle and/or have a fenced in yard so she could run around all she wants.

She is a medium to large sized dog as she weighs in just over 50 pounds.  So she isn't huge, but she is definitely not a toy breed or a small/lap dog.  Although she may think she is!  You know those dogs who are a bit too big to sit on your lap, but they try to anyway.  It's adorable.

Get our free mobile app

If you do have other dogs or other pets already in the house, since Opal was a transfer, it's not known if she will do well with other animals, or kids, for that matter.  Apparently she does well at the humane society, so far.  But if you do have other animals or kids in the house and you are questioning if Opal will be the right fit, the best thing to do is to make an appointment to see her and make some introductions.  You can contact the TCHS on their website here.  

Opal just looks like a happy dog, and apparently she is very happy and energetic at the humane society.  So, one would expect that if she is happy there, she will be ecstatic to be adopted into a family that wants an energetic dog.

Every Tuesday we feature an adoptable pet of the week.  Check back to see who we feature next week.

LOOK: Here Are 30 Foods That Are Poisonous to Dogs

To prepare yourself for a potential incident, always keep your vet's phone number handy, along with an after-hours clinic you can call in an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a hotline you can call at (888) 426-4435 for advice.

Even with all of these resources, however, the best cure for food poisoning is preventing it in the first place. To give you an idea of what human foods can be dangerous, Stacker has put together a slideshow of 30 common foods to avoid. Take a look to see if there are any that surprise you.

READ ON: See the States Where People Live the Longest

Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

Read on to learn the average life expectancy in each state.