November 22, 1928 - July 26, 2014

 

Rev. Severt Ole Score, age 85, St. Cloud, MN, died Saturday, July 26, 2014, in Sartell, MN.

Memorial service will be 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 30, at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, St. Cloud, MN, with visitation one hour prior. Interment will be in the columbarium at Bethlehem Lutheran Church. Funeral arrangements were made by Benson Funeral Home, St. Cloud, MN.

Severt Score was born November 22, 1928, in Sheridan Township, Dunn County, Wisconsin to Emil and Hettie (Baker) Score. He graduated from Prairie Farm High School in Prairie Farm, WI; Augsburg College in Minneapolis, MN; and Luther Theological Seminary in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Severt farmed with his family, then served in the US Army from 1955 to 1957. He married Beatrice Marie Anderson on May 18, 1957, at Faith Lutheran Church, Cameron, WI. Severt worked as a minister from 1964 to 2003, serving multipoint parishes in Saskatchewan, Canada; Alberta, Canada; North Dakota; Wisconsin; and Minnesota.

Throughout his life, Severt was an artist and a builder. His creative work included figurative rock assemblages, his main medium since 1990, as well as carved and modeled sculpture, oil and watercolor paintings, and poetry. He was a fine carpenter; in his final parish, in Cloquet, MN, he helped build an addition to the church, and in recent years, asked what he had done, often emphasized his volunteer work with Habitat for Humanity.

Survivors include his wife Beatrice Score of St. Cloud, MN; children Joel Score of Chicago, IL, Rebekah Score of Simi Valley, CA, and Jonathan (Danielle) Score, of Florida; brother Paul (Marilyn) Score of Boyceville, WI; sisters Marjorie Mrdutt of Menomonie, WI, Yvonne (Edwin) Kjos of Abbottsford, WI, Nancy (Dale) Cofield of Blaine, MN, and Patricia (Jim) Fleischhacker of Mahtomedi, MN; sister-in-law Gerda Score of Glen Burnie, Maryland; and 11 grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents; daughter Amber Garthus; brother Orville Score; and sisters Elaine Seivert, Edith Bloch, and Ann Bergeon.

In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred.