STOCKTON (AP) — Six new machines will soon be installed to monitor water quality on three branches of a trout-fishing waterway in Minnesota.

The LimnoTech machines will monitor stream levels, temperature, dissolved oxygen and turbidity. They'll also take samples when rain or snowmelt swells the Whitewater River's branches.

Neal Mundahl is a biology professor at the Winona State University and is in charge of the water study. He says the state's Legacy Amendment will fund the $500,000 project. He says the study is expected to last two years, but the machines could be reused in other streams.

The machines could help researchers identify the source of contaminated water if a contamination occurs.